On 12 April 1961, Yuri Gagarin’s space flight triggered a euphoric shock across the world. However, just a few decades after the first glorious trip, news of rocket and spacecraft accidents followed one after the other. Although at the beginning of the 2010s, Russia decided to revive its space industry, a clear breakthrough has not yet happened.

Declining Russian Space Industry
The economic difficulties that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union did Russian space research did no good. Scientific missions were postponed due to financial problems and attention shifted towards satellites and space tourism. Although, during the boom at the beginning of the new millennium, the Duma approved RUB 305 billion for the space sector for the period of 2006–2015, the 2008 global crisis overruled all calculations and hopes. Despite the advent of the Angara family or rockets or the GLONASS global positioning system development, the prestige of Russian space research went into steep decline as the result of an increasing number of space accidents. The accident suffered by the Proton-M rocket at Baykonur in July 2013, when it crashed to the ground soon after launch, was the final straw.

 

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